FAQ

Experienced operators are able to detect almost all ectopic pregnancies measuring more than a few millimetres in size on ultrasound scan. It is important to emphasize; however, that ectopic pregnancies tend to develop more slowly than intrauterine pregnancies and it often takes them longer to grow to the size which makes them visible on the scan.
The earliest ultrasound can confirm the presence of heartbeat is at 4 weeks of conception. In women who conceive after IVF the heartbeat can be seen four weeks after the day of oocyte collection. Again, in order to avoid coming for the scan too early it is best to delay the attendance until two and a half to three weeks after the missed period or four and a half to five weeks after conception oocyte collection.
A normal intrauterine pregnancy can be first seen on the scan three days after a missed menstrual period. In women who fall pregnant after fertility treatment such as ovarian stimulation the pregnancy can be seen 17 days after ovulation. In women who conceive after IVF the pregnancy can be seen 17 days after the day of oocyte collection. There are, however, small variations in the timing of conception and women who wish to confirm that their pregnancy is located within the uterus are advised to delay their attendance until a week after the missed period (or three weeks after conception) to avoid coming for the scan too early. This is particularly important in women with uterine abnormalities such as fibroids or adenomyosis, which make it harder to see the pregnancy and sometimes the diagnosis may be delayed for several days.
There is no evidence that ultrasound scans can harm pregnancies. It is important to ensure; however, that the energy of ultrasound beam is kept low. Use of pulsed Doppler devices to measure blood flow should be avoided in the first weeks of pregnancy as their energy output is higher compared to the ultrasound beam used for standard imaging. Our equipment is fully compliant with the international standards for safe use in pregnancy and the machine energy output is continuously monitored during the examination.
Vaginal bleeding does not affect quality of ultrasound diagnosis and scans can be safely performed on women who attend during menstrual periods or on those who are experiencing irregular vaginal bleeding.
Transvaginal ultrasound scan should not cause any significant discomfort and they are much easier to tolerate than smear tests. to minimise discomfort application of a lubrication gel containing local anaesthetic may make the examination easier to tolerate. Alternatively, local application of hormone oestrogen in the form of vaginal tablets or cream for one to two weeks prior to the examination may also be helpful.
Transvaginal ultrasound scan should not cause any significant discomfort and they are much easierto tolerate than smear tests. to minimise discomfort application of a lubrication gel containing localanaesthetic may make the examination easier to tolerate. Alternatively, local application of hormone oestrogen in the form of vaginal tablets or cream for one to two weeks prior to the examination may also be helpful.